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"Phantom Thread" is released in 70mm

The 70mm Newsletter
Written by: -Date: 09.12.2017
"Phantom Thread" Synopsis

Set in the glamour of 1950’s post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) and his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutants and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock. Women come and go through Woodcock’s life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma (Vicky Krieps), who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover. Once controlled and planned, he finds his carefully tailored life disrupted by love. With his latest film, Paul Thomas Anderson paints an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey, and the women who keep his world running. Phantom Thread is Paul Thomas Anderson’s eighth movie, and his second collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis.

"Phantom Thread"

Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson
Produced by Paul Thomas Anderson, Megan Ellison, JoAnne Sellar, Daniel Lupi
Written by Paul Thomas Anderson
Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lesley Manville, Vicky Krieps
Music by Jonny Greenwood
Edited by Dylan Tichenor
Production company: Annapurna Pictures, Ghoulardi Film Company, Perfect World Pictures

Distributed by Focus Features (USA), Universal Pictures (International)
Running time 130 minutes
More in 70mm reading:

Film review: "Phantom Thread" in 70mm

P T Anderson's "The Master" in System 65

"Inherent Vice" is released in70mm

70mm Blow Up List 2017 - by

Internet link:



"They are just digging the film"

"Phantom Thread" in 70mm at the AFI Silver. Picture by Howard B Haas.

While we wait for more "Phantom Thread" details, here's Director Paul Thomas Anderson, at the time of the release of "The Master", about watching 70mm prints in the cinema (transcribed from a YouTube video):

Question: Your choice to film in 65mm, appropriate to the period, obviously. Does it matter if your audience doesn't see that, because presumably only a minority of the audience are going to see it in 70mmn

Paul Thomas Anderson: Yes, no, I mean, does it matter? If you are in that kind of thing, you'll probably love it. You know, you’ll be able to feel a slight difference if you know, but it's ultimately No. I mean, listen, I've loved movies I've watched on my phone, I hate to say, and I loved moves I've seen in theatres

I mean, it's a hard thing now a days, and hopefully, you know, the people that loved to go to movie theatres, loved to go movie theatres, and we kind of hopefully presented this option, that if you wanna dig it this way, it's there for you. I prefer it. I enjoy it. I think it's a more well balanced meal, just in terms of the way that it kinda comes through the projector and the light and umm, and things moving around, and..... I prefer it. But certainly does not mean you are not gonna like the movie if you have to see it in any other way. It also doesn’t mean you gonna like it any more.

Question: Can't imagine what “The Master” would be like on a phone

Paul Thomas Andersson: [Laughs] Actually no, hopefully not too bad. Shouldn't matter, I mean, I remember like seeing, like these guys, like hovered around in a garage watching "Saving Private Ryan" on this like little teeny black and white TV, and these guys were just loving the film in a parking garage in South America, and they were completely in to it. They didn’t need it on a big screen, they didn’t need whatever HiFi sound and all that. They are just digging the film

IN 7OMM Theatres December 25, 2017

• Arclight Hollywood, LA
• The Landmark, LA
• AMC Lincoln Square 13, NYC

Expanding January 12, 2018 to:

• Alamo Drafthouse New Mission, SF
• Alamo Drafthouse Ritz, Austin
• Alamo Drafthouse Brooklyn, NYC
• The Music Box, Chicago
• AFI Silver, Silver Spring MD
• Coolidge Corner, Brookline, MA

International 2. February, 2018:

• Picture House Central, London, UK

About the filming on 3-perf 35mm film and 70mm prints


"The movie was shot 3 perf 35mm, which means you can't make prints without an optical. This means, to retain any quality they'd have to do a DI. For a true 35mm photochemical distribution from a 3 perf negative, this is the workflow: Cut OCN>3 perf IP> 3 to 4 perf blowup IN> release prints. So you'd be dealing with 4th generation for theatrical prints on 35mm. Where with a DI, you scan the negative and you laser out directly to 70mm IN. So release prints are being struck off a 70mm IN which for all practical purposes is an identical replica of the 3 perf 35mm negative. So you're dealing with prints made from 2nd generation, instead of 4th generation with the optical printing process. One could do an optical blow up directly from the negative, but the cost to do every single print that way, is exorbitant, so it's really never done."

Tyler Purcell, Cinematographer, Los Angeles, USA


We, at FotoKem, took the 35mm cut original and blew it up to 65mm. I must say, it looks fantastic!! There was NOT any 4K DIs made on "Phantom Thread". We made blown up 65mm I.P.'s and then I.N.'s & 70mm Prints."

Tony Magallanes, FotoKem, Los Angeles, USA

• Go to's list of films blown up to 70mm
• Go to Film review: "Phantom Thread" in 70mm

To be continued......

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Updated 21-01-18