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Widescreen in Japan

Read more at
in70mm.com
The 70mm Newsletter
Written by: Alain Dorange. All galleries and vintage adverts by Eiji Aoki-san, Tokyo, JapanDate: 21.12.2018
This article could have not been written without the huge help from my friend Eiji Aoki-san based in Tokyo. He spent a lot of time at the Library searching for newspapers adverts as well as some other data. This was a perfect collaboration.

• Gallery 1: Widescreen in Japan
• Gallery 2: Widescreen in Japan


By the year, four major theatres were built in Yurakucho (Amusement Quarter of Tokyo). "Gekijou" (Japanese for Theatre) were big by today’s standards:

- Nihon Gekijou (1933 - 1981): 2063 seats with 1900 + standing!
- Hibya Eiga Gekijou (1934 - 1984): 1375 seats
- Yurakuza (1935 - 1984): 1572 seats
- Tokyo Takarazuka Gekijou (1934 - 998): 2477 seats

Widescreen developments in Japan happened within the same time frame as the rest of the world. As of today, six major Studios are still active. For the record, we are showing the number of films they (including nonexistent one) produced in 1955:

TOEI - 106
SHOCHIKU - 71
TOHO - 66
SHIN-TOHO – 66 (Bankrupt in 1961 and ceased to exist. Its copyrights are presently owned by KOKUSAI HOEI, a TOHO subsidiary. Its namesake, established by its ex-employees after its bankruptcy, is unrelated.)
DAIEI - 59
NIKKATSU - 59
OKURA EIGA (Established in 1962 by Mitsugi Okura, ousted ex-president of bankrupt SHIN-TOHO. In 2001, film producing was spun off to its subsidiary OP EIGA Studios)

As a common rule, the opening dates for the new movies were the same for Tokyo and Osaka with some exceptions such as the 3-strip Cinerama presentations and some road shows. Japan had a very rich history in the showing of 70mm until the early 90's and only scarce information is known in the Western countries. As per Eiji’s search, the last blow-up 70mm movie released was "Cliffhanger" in 1993. As far as IMAX is concerned, the 15/70 disappeared in 2010.

For each movie, we are showing the dates as follows:
- Year: Initial release of the movie.
- Day-Month-Year: Release date in Japan.

 
More in 70mm reading:

Gallery 1: Widescreen in Japan
Gallery 2: Widescreen in Japan

The Mini IMAX Movies in 1570

More Widescreen At The Fairs

A Century of Widescreens at the World's Fairs

Widescreen In Malaya

Internet link:
 

I - CinemaScope

 
Like everywhere else in the world, the first anamorphic movie was "Seii" (The Robe), premiering at two theaters:

- Yuraku-za Theatre (Tokyo) on December 26th, 1953
- Nangai Gekijou (Osaka) on December 29th, 1953

The six local Studios followed and adapted the Anamorphic format to shoot their first movies:

- TOEI: "Otorijo no hanayome" (The bride of the Otori Castle)
Opened April 2nd, 1957.
Process:"ToeiScope" (Cinepanoramique)

- SHIN-TOHO: "Meiji Tenno to Nichiro Dai Senso” (The Emperor Meiji and the Great Russo Japanese War)
Opened on April 29th, 1957.
Process:"Shin-TohoScope" (Cinepanoramique)

- NIKKATSU: "Ghekka no wakamusha" (A young Samurai in the Moonlight)
Opened on July 9th, 1957.
Process:"NikkatsuScope" (DyaliScope from SATEC)

- TOHO: "Oatari sanshoku musume” (On Wings of Love)
Opened on July 13th, 1957.
Process: "TohoScope” (their own development)

- SHOCHIKU: "Dakareta hanayome" (The Embraced Bride)
Opened on July 14th, 1957.
Process: "Shochiku GrandScope" (ScanosCope)

- DAIEI: "Yuki no wataridori" (Migrating Bird from the Snow)
Opened on October 29th, 1957.
Process: "DaieiScope (ScanoScope)

Before all those "firsts", there were 2-reel shorts from Toei released on August 2nd, 1955 called "Rebyu no tanjo" (Birth of a Revue) with a ratio of 2.75:1 and Perspecta Sound. This was only for a Demo by Daie Studios and the Director was Yuge Susumu. However, Daie Studios were the latest finally to produce a long feature in the Scope format because they started first to shoot 10 movies in the VistaVision process (see Chapter VII). The Scope formats grew rapidly in Japan:

October 1955: 479 theatres
April 1956: 889 theatres
July 1956: 1022 theatres (345 with 4 tracks Magnetic and 677 with Mono Optical)

The Japanese companies also produced anamorphic lenses:

- Japan Optical Company (renamed Nikon Corporation in 1988)
- Kowa Company
- Keihan Optical Instruments Company
- Fuji Film for Anamorphic Adapter

The Miracle Screen also found its local competition, rival Yanagiya Sound Company.
 
 

II - CinemaScope 55

 
The two movies were shown in standard 35mm:

"Carousel" (1956 / 01.07.56)
"The King and I" (1956 / 26.10.56)

Both were played in the same theatre: Hibiya Yurakuza (Tokyo). They were also shown in Osaka. “The King and I" was re-released on January 15th, 1966 in 70mm at the Hibiya Scala-za.

• Go to CinemaScope 55
 
 

III - Three-Strip Cinerama

 
Cinerama was introduced in Japan in 1955, i.e. 3 years after the US. just by luck. The Chief of the Toho Studios (known for the Godzilla movies), when visiting New York found this process entertaining and decided to install it in two of their own theatres:

- Imperial Theatre (Teikoku Gekijou) in Tokyo
- OS Gekijou in Osaka

It was in those two theatres that Lowell Thomas first said the magical words "Ledi-Su and Jentorumen, Korega Shinerama Desu"! ("Ladies and Gentlemen, This is Cinerama").

3.1 - Listing of the 3-strip Cinerama
There were 5 theatres:

- Tokyo: Teikoku Gekijou (or Imperial Theatre): Ceased Cinerama presentation 3 weeks after the opening of Theatre Tokyo. The last Cinerama presentation was Cinemiracle (see Chapter XI).

- Tokyo: Theatre Tokyo (also called Super Cinerama Theatre with a screen of 25.9m x 8.8m)

- Osaka: OS Gekijou
- Kyoto: Toho Palace Gekijou
- Fukuoka: Asahi Kaikan

3.2 - Japanese titles of 5 travelogues and 2 features

- KORE GA Cinerama DA (TIC)
- Cinerama HOLIDAY (CH)
- SEKAI NO NANA FUSHIGI (7W)
- NANKAI NO BOUKEN (SSA)
- SEKAI NO RAKUEN (SFP)
- SEIBU KAITAKU SHI (HTWWW)
- FUSHIGI NA SEKAI NO MONOGATARI (BG)

The "Best of Cinerama" and "Russian Adventure" were not shown in Japan.

3.3 - Dates of release

- TOKYO: Teikoku Gekijou - Imperial Theatre (970 seats)

TIC: 05.01.55 to 20.12.55
CH: 21.12.55 to 14.03.57
7W: 15.03.57 to 31.05.58
SFP: 01.06.58 to 24.04.59
SSA: 25.04.59 to 30.06.60
CH: 01.07.60 to 28.12.60 (re-released)
7W: 29.12.60 to 30.07.61 (re-released)
SFP: 01.08.61 to 21.12.61 (re-released)
TIC: 22.12.61 to 27.04.62 (re-released)

- TOKYO: Theatre Tokyo (Successor of Imperial Theatre)

HTWWW: 25.11.62 to 05.03.64
BG: 06.03.64 to 31.10.64
TIC: 01.11.64 to 30.11.64 (re-released) - part of: Cinerama Festival
CH: 01.12.64 to 31.12.64 (re-released) - part of: Cinerama Festival
7W: 01.01.65 to 31.01.65 (re-released) - part of: Cinerama Festival
SFP: 01.03.65 to 31.03.65 (re-released) - part of: Cinerama Festival
SSA: 01.04.65 to 30.04.65 (re-released) - part of: Cinerama Festival

- OSAKA: OS Gekijou (1300 seats)

TIC: 14.01.55 to 23.12.55
CH: 24.12.55 to 14.03.57
7W: 15.03.57 to 30.05.58
SFP: 01.06.58 to 24.04.59
SSA: 25.04.59 to 30.06.60
HTWWW: 29.11.62 to 05.03.64
BG: 06.03.64 to 31.10.64

- FUKUOKA: Asahi Kaikan

TIC: 12.07.63 to? (no data available)

- KYOTO: Toho Palace Gekijou

TIC: 15.11.63 to? (no data available)

• Go to in70mm.com's Cinerama page
 
 

IV - Theaters equipped with 70mm Projectors

 
There were 53* theatres equipped with 70mm projectors, including 2 theatres for D-150 screens. Then another 11 for the Cinerama 70mm, giving a total of 65* theaters. The 11 Cinerama theatres are shown in Chapter XII.

* The list below is non-exhaustive and open to new discoveries.

Hokkaidou:
- Asahikawa: Asahikawa Gekijou
- Sapporo: Nihon Gekijou
- Sapporo Gekijou

Tohoku:
- Miyagi: Sendai Toho Gekijou

Kanto:
- Gumma: Takasaki Orion-za

- Chiba:
Chiba Gekijou
Yawata Scala-za

- Tokyo:
Yurakuza
Scala-za
Nihon Gekijou
Nichigeki Plaza
Marunouchi Piccadilly
Marunouchi Piccadilly 1 & 2
Marunouchi Louvre
Togeki (Tokyo Gekijou)
Shinjuku Koma Stadium
Shinjuku Plaza Gekijou (D-150)
Shinjuku Gekijou
Shinjuku Piccadilly
Shinjuku Academy
Shinjuku Sala-za
Shinjuku Bunka Gekijou
Shinjuku Musashino-kan
Shibuya Tokyu
Shibuya Toho
Ikebukuro Gekijou
Asakusa Scala-za

- Kanagawa: Yokohama Toho

Chubu
- Nagano: Theatre Gin-ei
- Aichi:
Nagoya Grand Gekijou
Mainichi Hall Daigekijou
Meitetsu Toho
Scala-za (Nagoya)
Imaike Gekijou
- Gifu: Yanagase Shurakukan

Kinki
- Kyoto: Kyoyo Toho kouraku
- Osaka:
Hankyu Plaza Gekijou (D-150)
Umeda Toei Palace
Kitano Gekijou
Umeda Koma Stadium
Sanbangai Cinema
Umeda Piccadilly
Umeda Grand
Nangai Gekijou
Osaka Schochiku-za
Sennichimae Kokusai Gekijou
Sennichimae Subaru-za

Chugoku
- Hiroshima:
Hiroshima Takarazuka Gekijou
Hiroshima Asahi Kaikan
Fukuyama Daikoku-za

Kyushu
- Fukuoka:
Fukuoka Scala-za
Fukuoka Piccadilly

Beside the American and European projectors were also the Japanese local brands:

- Nichion Imperial All Purpose 70/35
- Nichion Crown 70/35
- Toshiba Denko TP-700 35/70
-
Toshiba Denko Tp-7000 35mm/70mm

• Go to 70mm Film Projectors
 
 

V - Todd-AO

 
- "Oklahoma!": opened December 28th, 1956, one year after The Rivoli (New York) in two locations:

Tokyo: Shinjuku Koma Stadium (Screen of 25.8m x 10.8m)
Osaka: Umeda Koma Stadium

- "Around the World in 80 Days" (1956 / 20.07.57)
- "South Pacific" (1958 / 01.01.59). Premiered at the Shochiku Piccadilly October 31st, 1959

- "Can-Can" (1960 / 02.06.60)
- "The Alamo" (1960 / 24.12.60)
- "Cleopatra" (1963 / 26.11.63)
- "The Sound of Music" (1965 / 26.06.65)
- "The Agony and the Ecstasy" (1965 / 12.02.66)
- "Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines" (1965 / 09.10.65)
- "Doctor Doolittle" (1967 / 15.12.67)
- "Star!" (1968 / 17.08.68)
- "Hello Dolly!" (1969 / 19.12.69)
- "Airport" (1970 / 25.04.70)

• Go to
in70mm.com's Todd-AO Page
 
 

VI - Ultra Panavision 70

 
The first MGM Camera 65 / Ultra Panavision 70 was "Ben Hur” and premiered at the Theatre Tokyo April 1st, 1960, with a running period of 469 days. There was an Imperial Premiere on March 31st for Charity in presence of the Emperor Hirohito with his wife along with Charlton Heston and his wife. Rumors said the film broke three times during the first ten minutes. The Emperor remained impassive.

- "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1962 / 01.12.62): The first non-Cinerama film after "Windjammer" at Imperial Theatre.
- "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" (1963 / 28.12.63)
- "The Fall of the Roman Empire" (1964 / 18.07.64)
- "Battle of the Bulge" (1965 / 01.04.66)
- "An Homage To D. W. Griffith" (1989)

Refer to Chapter XII for "The Greatest Story Ever Told”, “The Hallelujah Trail" and "Khartoum".

• Go to Motion pictures photographed in MGM Camera 65 / Ultra Panavision 70
 
 

VII - Japanese VistaVision

 
Ten movies, shot with VistaVision cameras, were produced by DAIEI Studios during 1957 and 1958. These films never appeared in the international listing and were not shown outside of Japan:

- "Jigokubana” (The Flower of Hell) 1957 / 25.06.57
- "Yuuwaku kara no dasshutsu" (Evading from Seduction) 1957 / 13.07.56
- "Zenigata Heiji torimono hikae: Onna kitsune yashiki” (Case Reports from the Inspector Zenigata Heiji) 1957 / 13.08.57
- "Mahiru no taiketsu" (The Duel at Noon) 1957 / 03.09.1957
- "Meido no kaoyaku" (The Master of the Other World) 1957 / 22.10.57
- "Akado Suzunosuke: Ippon ashi no majin" (Akado Suzunosuke, the one leg warlock) 1957 / 28.12.57
- "Tokyo no hitomi" (The Eyes of Tokyo) 1958 / 03.01.58
- "Tsukihime keizu" (Genealogy of the Princess Moon) 1958 / 09.01.58
- "Yuukyou gonin otoko" (The Five Youxia) 1958 / 15.01.58
- "Hyouheki" (The Ice Cliff) 1958 / 18.03.58


 
 

VIII - Technirama (Presented in Super Technirama 70)

 
8.1: Japanese Productions

Three movies were produced with this process:

- "Shaka" (Buddha) (1961 / 01.11.61)
Premiered at the Yurakuza (Tokyo)
Director: Kenji Misumi
Produced by Daiei Studios under the name of: Daiei Super Technirama 70
Some sequences shot in anamorphic DaieiScope
Daiei used their existing VistaVision cameras

- "Taiheiyo Senso to Himeyuri Butai" (The Pacific War and the Star Lily Corps) (1962 / 07.04.62) Premiered at Togeki, Shinjuku Milano-za and Shibuya Pantheon (Tokyo).
Director: Kiyoshi Komori
Produced by Okura Eiga.
Using the cameras borrowed from Daiei.
The lenses are from Panavision.

- "Shinno Shikotei" (The Great Wall) (1962 / 01.11.62)
Premiered at the Yurakuza (Tokyo)
Director: Shigeo Tanaka
Produced by Daiei Studios for their 30th Anniversary and filmed in Taiwan

8.2: Overseas Productions

- "Cartagine in Fiamme" (1960 / 26.05.60)
- "Spartacus" (1960 / 15.12.60)
- "King of Kings" (1961 / 15.12.61)
- "El Cid" (1961 / 27.04.62)
- "Un, Deux, Trois, Quatre" (Black Tights) (1961 / 24.06.61)
- “Madame Sans Gêne” (1961 / 18.08.62)
- "Barabbas" (1962 / 31.08.62)
- "55 Days at Peking" (1963 / 24.10.63)
- "Circus World" (1964 / 19.12.64)
- "Custer of the West" (1967 / 24.02.68)

• Go to Super Technirama 70
 
 

IX - Super Panavision 70

 
- "Exodus" (1960 / 14.07.61)
- "West Side Story" (1961 / 23.12.61)
- "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962 / 14.02.63)
- "My Fair Lady" (1964 / 01.12.64)
- "Cheyenne Autumn" (1964 / 19.12.64)
- "Lord Jim" (1965 / 01.10.65)
- "Grand Prix" (1966 / 01.02.67)
- "2OO1: A Space Odyssey" (1968 / 11.04.68)

Durign the late 70s, re-released repeatedly in Cinerama / D150 / conventional 70mm. Re-released 2018 "unrestored" 70mm for the film's fiftieth anniversary at the Nagase Memorial Theatre OZU of National Film Archive (Tokyo: ex-National Film Center Room 1) from October 6th to October 14th (12 shows).

- "Ice Station Zebra" (1968 / 21.12.68)
- "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" (1968 / 18.12.68)
- “Mackenna Gold" (1969 / 05.04.69)
- "Song of Norway" (1970 / 19.06.71)

In Japan it was never shown on Cinerama screens.

- "Ryan's Daughter" (1970 / 24.04.71)
- "PlayTime" (1967 / 14.06.69)

This is not a Super Panavision 70 movie but is on its own as far as the [65mm, aspect ratio: 1,75:1] format is concerned. Premiered at the Marunouchi Piccadilly (Tokyo).

- "Brainstorm" (1983 / 14.04.84)
- "Far and Away" (1992 / 18.07.92)

In 1987-89 Panavision developed the Panavision System 65 cameras and named the release prints "Panavision Super 70". Though currently a few directors such like Ron Howard ("Far and Away"), Ron Fricke ("Samsara") and Kenneth Branagh ("Hamlet" & "Murder on the Orient Express") have used it for entire features, "Far and Away" remain the only Panavision Super 70 film released theatrically in 70mm in Japan. (Paul Thomas Anderson and Christopher Nolan used the System 65 for parts of
"The Master" and "Dunkirk").

• Go to Motion pictures photographed in Super Panavision 70 & Panavision System 65
 
 

X - Sovscope 70

 
- "The Story of the Flaming Years" (1961 / 20.01.62)
- "The Sleeping Beauty" (1964 / 21.09.65)
- "Bolshoi Ballets 67" (1965 / 26.11.65)
- "War and Peace" (1966)

Presented in two parts:
• Part 1: (Austerlitz + Natasha), 210 minutes on 23.07.66
• Part 2: (Borodino + The Terrible Years), 177 minutes on 23.11.67

- "Liberation" (1970)

Initially a 5 parts WW2 Epic for the TV about the major eastern front Soviet Campaigns against the Nazi Germany.

It was shown in Sovscope 70 in 3 parts:
• Parts 1 and 2: The Fire Bulge + The Breakthrough (1970 / 11.07.70). Duration: 88 Minutes + 85 Minutes
• Part 3: The Direction of Main Blow (1970 / 31.07.71). Presented with Intermission. Total duration: 122 Minutes
• Parts 4 and 5: The Battle of Berlin + The Last Assault (12.08.72). Duration: 79 Minutes + 71 Minutes. This is a film from Yarly Ozerov also known as "The Great Battle"

- "Dersu Uzula" (1975 / 02.08.75)

Directed by the Japanese director Akira Kurosawa (well known for "Seven Samurai" and "Ran") at the request of Russia. Movie founded by Mosfilm. On October 7th, 2017, two screenings in 70mm took place at then National Film Center (now National Film Archive) in Tokyo to celebrate the UNESCO World Day of Audiovisual Heritage. The screen is 9.7m x 4.6m. NFC is the only theatre in Japan still equipped with 35/70 projectors Kinoton FP75E-S.
 
 

XI - Cinemiracle

 
- "Windjammer" (1962)

There was no Cinemiracle installation in Japan, so the projections were on Cinerama screens. This movie was shown at the following theatres:

Tokyo:
Imperial Theatre - 28.04.62 to 21.12.62.
Theatre Tokyo - 01.02.65 to 28.02.65. - part of: Cinerama Festival

Osaka:
OS Gekijou - 28.04.62 to 21.12.62

The Japanese title was "Taiseiyou Niman Mairu", literally meaning "Twenty Thousand Miles on the Atlantic", which is, aimingly or not, easily associated with Jules Verne's famous novel "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea".

• Go to Louis de Rochemont's "Windjammer" produced in Cinemiracle
 
 

XII - Super Cinerama 70mm

 
12.1: Theatre Listing

The four existing 3-Strip Cinerama theatres (excluding Teikoku Gekijou, where only 3-strip Cinerama presentations were held) converted to Cinerama 70mm preserving their [louvered] plastic-tape screen. 6 additional Cinerama screens (70mm from the outset) opened:

Tokyo:
Theatre Tokyo (3-strip into single strip)*
Shochiku Central**
Shinjuku Milano-za**
Shibuya Pantheon**

Nagoya:
Chuchini Cinerama Gekijou***
(opened on 20.12.64 with a screen of 30m x 11m, claiming tthe biggest screen in Japan)
Cinerama Nagoya**

Kyoto:
Kyoto Toho Palace Gekijou (3-strip into single strip, almost the same size as Chunichi Cinerama.)*

Osaka:
OS Gekijou (3-strip into single strip)*
Namba Dai Gekijou**

Fukuoka:
Fukuoka Asahi Kaikan (3-strip into single strip)*

Most of the Cinerama theatres belonged to TOHO (*) chain or SHOCHIKU(**) chain. Chunichi Cinerama (***) was independent. Curiously the most famous TT and OS were not directly owned by TOHO, which made their life difficult, especially for OS, in later years (see Chapter XVI).

12.2: The Films

- "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" (1963 / 28.12.63)
- "Mediterranean Holiday" (1962 / 01.05.65)
- "Circus World" (1964 / 19.12.64)

In Nagoya it was the opening film of Chunichi Cinerama Theatre (25.12.64). Curiously no ads in Tokyo / Nagoya / Osaka showed Cinerama logos, though besides Chunichi Cinerama three (2 Tokyo + 1 Osaka) theatres were equipped with a Cinerama screen at a certain period of their lives.

- "The Greatest Story Ever Told" (1965 / 04.09.65)
- "The Hallelujah Trail" (1965 / 23.09.65)
- "Battle of the Bulge" (1965 / 01.04 66)
- "Khartoum" (1966 / 28.10.66)
- "Grand Prix" (1966 / 01.02.67)
- "Custer of the West" (1967 / 24.02.68)
- "2OO1: A Space Odyssey" (1968 / 11.04.68)
- "Ice Station Zebra" (1968 / 21.12.68)
- "Krakatoa East of Java" (1968 / 11.01.69)

The World Premiere took place on Thursday, January 9th at the Shibuya Pantheon (Tokyo). Two more theatres join the Pantheon: The Shochiku Milano-za and the Shochiku Central.
 
 

XIII - Kinopanorama (3-Strips)

 
The 3-Strips Kinopanorama had a brief history in Japan. Only one movie was shown: "Ooinaru Rakuen" (Two Hours in USSR) - July to October 1962. The theatre was Asakusa Shochikuza in Tokyo and was opened by the Shochiku Studios, competitor of Toho Studios which introduced the Cinerama in this country. As a reminder, "Ooinaru Rakuen" is a compilation of the first two Kinopanorama movies: "Great is my Country" and "The Enchanted Mirror". Kinopanorama was called Kinerama in Japan and Cinerama was called Shinerama.

• Go to Kinopanorama
 
 

XIV - MCS 70

 
- "Sheherazade" (1963 / 28.09.63)
- "The Black Tulip" (1964 / 18.04.64)
- "Apache Last Battle" or "Old Shatterhand" (1964 / 25.06.66)
- "Uncle Tom's Cabin" (1965 / 18.09.65)
- "Mediterranean Holiday”. Refer to Chapter 12.2

• Got to MCS 70 - Superpanorama
 
 

XV - Dimension 150

 
Two theatres were equipped with D-150 screens (and the D-150 lenses):

- Shinjuku Plaza (Tokyo) opened on October 31st, 1969
- Hankyu Plaza Gekijou (Osaka) opened on November 30th, 1969

No international list mentions the two theatres. The only two Dimension 150 movies were shown:

- "The Bible...in the beginning" (1966 / 08.10.66)

First run was naturally not presented in D-150 but curiously in the Cinerama and standard 70mm theatres. Later shown at Hankyu Plaza (05.09.70).

- "Patton" (1970 / 27.06.70)

Non D-150 movies were also presented on the D-150 screen. The list below is non-exhaustive and open to new discoveries:

- “Gone With the Wind” (1939 / 25.04.70)
- "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" (1954 / 20.11.71)
- "The King and I" (1956 / 30.10.71)
- "South Pacific" (1958 / 06.03.71)
- "West Side Story" (1961 / 09.10.71)
- “How the West was Won” (1962 / 14.02.70)
- "Mediterranean Holiday" (1962 / 08.05.71)
- "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" (1963 / 29.03.71)
- "The Hallelujah Trail" (1965 / 06.02.71Osaka, 27.02.71Tokyo)
- ”Those Magnificent Men" (1965 / 12.06.71)
- "The Sand Pebbles" (1966 / 03.10.70)
- "Once Upon a Time in the West" (1968 / 04.10.69)
- "Cleopatra" (1963 / 30.05.70)
- "2OO1: A Space Odyssey" (1968 / 27.10.79) The ad doesn't show the D-150 logo.
- "Paint Your Wagon" (1969 / 20.12.69)
- "Tora! Tora! Tora!" (1970 / 25.09.70)
- "Scrooge" (1970 / 19.12.70)
- "Kelly's Heroes" (1970 / 26.12.70)
- "Strogoff" (1970 / 20.03.71)
- "Le Mans" (1971 / 04.12.71)
- "El Condor" (1971 / 25.12.71)
- "The Poseidon Adventure" (1972 / 05.05.73)
- "The Godfather" (1972 / 15.07.72)
- "The Day of the Jackal " (1973 / 15.09.73)
- "Papillon" (1974 / 16.03.74)
- "Zardoz" (1974 / 10.07.74)
- "Earthquake" (1974 / 14.12.74)
- "Rollerball" (1975 / 26.07.75)
- "Close Encounter of the Third Kind" (1977 / 25.2,78)
- "Star Wars" (1977 / 24.06.78)
- "Grease" (1978 / 16.12.78)
- "Alien" (1979 / 21.07.79)
- "Apocalypse Now" (1979 / 15.03.80 at Shinjuku Plaza)
- "The Empire Strikes Back" (1979 / 28.06.80)
- "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981 / 05.12.81)
- "The Return of the Jedi" (1983 / 02.07.83)

Many of the films shown in (authorised/unauthorised) "Cinerama" at Theatre Tokyo were also shown in (unauthorised) D-150 at Shinjuku Plaza, including SW EP 4 & 5 (and 6 after the closure of TT). In Osaka it was seldom the case due to the vicinity of OS Theatre and Hankyu plaza. Therefore the D-150 theatres in Tokyo/Osaka often presented different films, in contrast to the twin Cinerama theatres. In early 80s Shinjuku Plaza scrapped its D-150 screen, and Hankyu Plaza ended its 15-year life in 1984 due to the redevelopment of the quarter.
 
 

XVI - Standard 70mm movies (blown-ups included) on Cinerama Screens

 
The list below is non-exhaustive and open to new discoveries.
Some films were presented on Cinerama screen only when re-released.

- "Gone with the Wind" (1939 / 11.02.72)
- "The Bridge on the River Kwai" (1957 / 14.04.73)
- "Ben Hur" (1959 / 20.09.68)
- "West Side Story" (1961 / 09.11.74)
- "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962 / 20.02.71)
- "Cleopatra" (1963 / 19.02.77)
- "Doctor Zhivago" (1965 / 23.11.76)
- "The Bible in the Beginning" (1966 / 29.05.76)
- "The Dirty Dozen" (1967 / 06.10.67)
- "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" (1968 / 13.03.76)
- "Alfred the Great" (1969 / 18.10.69)
- "Goodbye Mr Chips" (1969 / 20.12.69)
- "Winning" (1969 / 25.10.69)
- "Mackenna's Gold" (1969 / 05.04.69)
- "Marooned" (1969 / 11.04.70)
- "Monte Carlo Rally" (1969 / 19/7/69)
- "Cromwell" (1970 / 30.10.71)
- "Patton" (1970 / 27.06.70)
- "Darling Lili" (1970 / 18.07.70)
- "Tora! Tora! Tora!" (1970 / 25.09.70)
- "Fiddler on the Roof" (1971 / 18.09.76)
- "Le Mans" (1971 / 17.07.71)
- "The African Elephant" (1971 / 13.05.72)
- "Red Sun" (1971 / 26.11.71)
- "Young Winston" (1972 / 02.06.73)
- "The Great Waltz" (1972 / 10.03.73)
- "Elvis on Tour" (1972 / 23.12.72)
- "The Godfather" (1972 / 15.07.72)
- "Lost Horizon" (1973 / 07.07.73)
- "The Day of the Jackal" (1973 / 15.09.73)
- "Westworld" (1973 / 15.12.73)
- "The Outfit" (1973 / 09.02.74)
- "Papillon" (1973 / 16.03.74)
- "Zardoz" (1974 / 10.08.74)
- "One by One" (1974 / 16.10.76)
- "Earthquake" (1974 / 14.12.74)
- "Rollerball" (1975 / 26.07.75)
- "Three Days of the Condor" (1975 / 29.11.75)
- "Rosebud" (1975 / 31.01.76)
- "Lucky Lady" (1975 / 13.03.76)
- "The Food for the Gods" (1976 / 22.01.77)
- "The Message" (1976 / 19.03.77)
- "Logan's Run" (1976 / 16.04.77)
- "Damnation Alley" (1977 / 10.09.77)
- "Close Encounter of the Third Kind" (1977 / 25.2,78)
- "Star Wars" (1977 / 24.06.78)
- "Grease" (1978 / 16.12.78)
- "The Deer Hunter" (1978 / 17.03.79)
- "The Wiz" (1978 / 06.10.79)
- "Alien" (1979 / 21.07.79)
- "Moonraker" (1979 / 8.12.79)
- "Apocalypse Now" (1979 / 16.02.80 at Osaka and 15.03.80 at Tokyo)
- "The Black Hole" (1979 / 20.12.80)
- "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980 / 28.06.80)
- "Heaven's Gate" (1980 / 26.09.81 to 31.10.81). This was the last movie at the Theatre Tokyo. The adverts did not show the Cinerama logo, but it was in Super Cinerama.
- "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981 / 05.12.81)
- "Poltergeist" (1982 / 17.07.82)
- "Brainstorm" (1983 / 14.04.84)
- "Starman" (1985 / 20.04.85)
- "Young Sherlock Holmes" (1985 / 29.03.86)
- "Silverado" (1985 / 01.03.86)
- "Rambo: First Blood Part II" (1985 / 16.05.87)
- "Back to the Future" (1985 / 14.05.88)
- "Aliens" (1986 / 16.05.87)
- "The Living Daylights" (1987 / 12.12.87)
- "The Untouchables" (1987 / 27.02.89)
- "Willow" (1988 / 23/07/88)
- "Cocoon: The Return" (1988 / 01.04.89)
- "Die Hard" (1988 / 01.04.89)
- ”Nemo" (1989 / 15.07.89)
- "Black Rain" (1989 / 09.12.89)
- "Dick tracy" (1990 / 90.12.14)

In late 80s blockbuster 70mm prints were often not presented at OS theatre but at TOHO-owned smaller screens in the same quarter, much to the disappointment of Osaka moviegoers. Some of such films, including the ones whose first-run was in the rival SHOCHIKU chain, were shown on second-run, sometimes even double-featured, at OS several months later. You will find double-feature ads in the photo gallery.
 
 

XVII - Films blown up to 70mm

 
The list below is non-exhaustive and open to new discoveries.

• Go to in70mm.com's list of films blown up to 70mm

- "Gone with the Wind" (1939 / re-release in 70mm 07.04.67, 16.03.68, and several times thereafter)
- "The King and I" (1956 / re-release in 70mm 15.01.66)
- "Guns of Navarone" (1961 / re-release in 70mm 15.03.69) at 3 theatres in Tokyo:

Togeki (a.k.a. Tokyo Gekijou)
Shinjuku Piccadilly
Shibuya Tokyu

Japan was the only country to witness Guns of Navarone in 70mm

- "Taras Bulba" (1962 / 22.12.62)
- "The Longest Day" (1962 / re-release in 70mm 21.09.68)
- "Bye Bye Birdie" (1963 / 18.10.63)
- "The Cardinal" (1963 / 06.06.64)
- "Genghis Khan" (1965 / 22.07.65)
- "In Harm's Way" (1965 / 24.07.65)
- "Operation Crossbow" (1965 / 30.07.65)
- "Heroes of Telemark" (1965 / 24.12.65)
- "The Great Race" (1965 / 25.12.65)
- "Doctor Zhivago" (1965 / 11.06.66)
- "The Professionals" (1966 / 17.12.66)
- "Is Paris Burning?" (1966 / 21.12.66)
- "The Sand Pebbles" (1966 / 18.03.67)
- "Les Demoiselles de Rochefort" (1967 / 08.08.67)
- "Camelot" (1967 / 02.12.67)
- "The Comedians" (1967 / 16.12.67)
- "Far From the Maddening Crowd" (1967 / 10.02.68)
- "Half a Sixpence" (1967 / 20.07.68)
- "Guns for San Sebastian" (1968 / 23.04.68)
- "Oliver!" (1968 / 09.10.68)
- "Where Eagles Dare" (1968 / 21.12.68)
- "Hell in the Pacific" (1968 / 21.12.68)
- "Hellfighters" (1968 / 25.12.68)
- "Funny Girl" (1968 / 22.02.69)
- "The Shoes of the Fisherman" (1968 / 05.04.69)
- "Once Upon a Time in the West" (1968 / 31.10.69)
- "The Wild Bunch" (1969 / 09.08.69)
- "Anne of the Thousand Days" (1969 / 26.09.70)
- "Darling Lili" (1970 / 18.07.70)
- "Tora! Tora! Tora!" (1970 / 25.09.70)
- "Scrooge" (1970 / 19.12.70)
- "Waterloo" (1970 / 19.12.70)
- "Elvis That's the Way it is" (1970 / 11.02.71). Also, known as "Elvis on Stage"
- "Once Upon a Wheel" (1971 / 20.11.71)
- "Fiddler on the Roof" (1971 / 04.12.71)
- "Nicholas and Alexandra" (1971 / 22.04.72)
- "Mary, Queen of Scots" (1971 / 24.06.72)
- "Antony and Cleopatra" (1972 / 18.03.72)
- "The Cowboys" (1972 / 29.04.72)
- "The Godfather" (1972 / 15.07.72)
- "Man of la Mancha" (1972 / 16.12.72)
- "The Poseidon Adventure" (1972 / 17.03.73)
- "Papillon" (1973 / 16.03.74)
- "The Three Musketeers" (1973 / 27.04.74)
- "The Great Gatsby" (1974 / 03.08.74)
- ‘’Earthquake’’ (1974 / 14.12.74)
- "Airport 1975" (1974 / 14.12.74)
- "Gold" (1974 / 15.01.75)
- "That's Entertainment" (1974 / 21.03.75)
- "Rollerball" (1975 / 26.07.75)
- "Lucky Lady" (1975 / 13.03.76)
- "The Wind and the Lion" (1975 / 24.04.76)
- "The Food of the Gods" (1976 / 22.01.77)
- "The Return of A Man Called Horse" (1976 / 11.02.77)
- "A Star is Born" (1976 / 12.03.77)
- "Close Encounter of the Third Kind" (1977 / 25.02.78)
- "Star Wars" (1977 / 24.06.78)
 
 
- "Grease" (1978 / 16.12.78)
- ‘’The Deer Hunter’’ (1978 / 17.03.79)
- "Superman" (1978 / 30.06.79)
- ‘’Alien’’ (1979 / 21.07.79)
- "Moonraker" (1979 / 08.12.79)
- "1941" (1979 / 08.03.80)
- ‘’Apocalypse Now’’ (1979 / 15.03.80)
- ‘’The Black Hole’’ (1979 / 20.12.80)
- "Altered States" (1980 / 11.04.81)
- "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980 / 28.06.80)
- "Superman II" (1980 / 27.06 81)
- "Heaven's Gate" (1980 / 26.09.81)
- "Outland" (1981 / 25.07.81)
- "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981 / 05.12.81)
- "Quest for fire" (1981 / 22.05.82)
- "Poltergeist" (1982 / 17.07.82)
- "Tron" (1982 / 15.09.82)
- "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial" (1982 / 04.12.82)
- "The Return of the Jedi" (1983 / 02.07.83)
- "The Right Stuff" (1983 / 08.09.84)
- "Anna Pavlova" (1983 / 06.10.84)
- "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (1984 / 07.07.84)
- "Amadeus" (1984 / 02.02.85)
- "Starman" (1984 / 20.04.85)
- "Back to the Future" (1985 / 07.12.85)
- "The Goonies" (1985 / 07.12.85)
- "A Chorus Line" (1985 / 14.12.85)
- "Silverado" (1985 / 01.03.86)
- "Young Sherlock Holmes" (1985 / 29.03.86)
- "Aliens" (1986 / 30.08.86)
- "Howard the Duck" (1986 / 06.12.86)
- "Top Gun" (1986 / 06.12.86)
- “The Mission” (1986 / 18.04.87)
- "The Untouchables" (1987 / 03.10.87)
- "The Living Daylights" (1987 / 12.12.87)
- "Robocop" (1987 / 11.02.88)
- "Willow" (1988 / 23.07.88)
- "Le Grand Bleu (English version)" (1988 / 20.08.88)
- "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" (1988 / 03.12.88)
- "Die Hard" (1988 / 04.02.89)
- "The Bear" (1988 / 15.07.89)
- "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (1989 / 08.07.89)
- "Black Rain" (1989 / 07.10.89)
- "Lethal Weapon 2" (1989 / 14.10.89)
- "Batman"(1989 / 02.12.89)
- "Dick tracy" (1990 / 14.12.89)
- "The Godfather III" (1990 / 09.03.91)
- "Memphis Bell" (1990 / 08.12.91)
- "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Countny" (1991 / 29.02.92)
- "Hook" (1991 / 20.06.92)
- "Beauty and the Beast" (1991 / 23.09.92)
- "Patriot Games" (1992 / 01.08.92)
- "1492: Conquest of Paradise" (1992 / 10.10.92)
- "Cliffhanger" (1993 / 04.12.93): The last theatrical 70mm presentation so far (hopefully) in Japan except for IMAX DMR and one-off events.
- "Dinosaur" (2000 / 12.11.00). Premiered at the Seibu Dome, Stadium at the outskirt of Tokyo.20 000 seats were available. Screen size: 25m x13.5m.
- "Pearl Harbor" (2001 / 21.06.00). Premiered at the Tokyo Dome 8 Channel DTS Sound.

There were no Japanese features shot in 35mm blown up to 70mm, except for some cartoons (see Chapter 23). The film "Hakkodasan" (1977) was scheduled to be blown up but was finally aborted.

What is "Vista Size" we sometimes hear in Japan? In later years, the movies not horizontally shot but having an aspect ratio of 1.85:1 (whether or not it’s blown) are called Vista Size in Japan (not an official label). For example, “The Godfather II" (35mm, image horizontally narrower than and vertically equal to cinemascope) and "E.T." (blown up in 70mm, image horizontally equal to and vertically taller than cinemascope).
 
 

XVIII - GOTO Inc.

 
In 1921, the young Seizo Goto was employed in a company manufacturing optics. In 1926, he opened his own company manufacturing small telescopes of 25mm diameter to be used by amateur astronomers. His company was called GOTO Optical Manufacturing Co. In 1933, he acquired a new factory at Setagaya (Tokyo). After 20 years of telescope sales, mostly for the schools, he identified a potential market for the Planetarium projectors. He studied the Zeiss Planetariums and the projector designed for the Morrison Planetarium in San Francisco. This will be the basis for the coming GOTO Planetariums. When exhibiting at the International Fair of Tokyo in 1959 and the one of New York in 1960, he received 74 orders. The rest is history. From 1963, the factory moved to Fuchu, suburb of Tokyo, and is still there at present. GOTO Optical Manufacturing Co. is now the leader for Japanese Planetariums and developed the Astrorama projection device for the Osaka Expo 70 (refer to the next Chapter). In 1967, GOTO designed a wrap-around motion picture under the name of ASTROVISION. In 1969, the system used a 35mm 5 perfs film + a fish eye lens for Dome projections.

Then ASTROVISION 35 used 35mm 8 perfs.

1969: first theatre at the Fujikyu Highland Amusement Park
1992: Theatre at the Indira Gandhi Planetarium (Lucknow / India)
1994: Kyongbuk Institute of Science Education (South Korea)
2002: Sam Chuck Cave Museum (South Korea)

ASTROVISION 70 with 70mm 10 perfs, vertical pulldown and mostly printed from OMNIMAX negatives (refer to Chapter 20). This improved system is used by most of the Japanese Planetariums and some overseas:

1990: National Science Museum Celestial Hall Astrovision (Taejon / South Korea)
1995: China Science & Technology Museum (Beijing / China)
1997: Kolkata Science City Space Odyssey Theatre (Kolkata / India)
2002: Astronomy and Space Science Center Military Academy (Cairo / Egypt)
2004: Bhasani Novo Theatre (Daka / Bangladesh)
2005: Lucknow Space Theatre (Lucknow / India)
2006: Hebei Science & Technology Museum (Hebei / China)
2008: Nehru Science Center (Mumbai / India)

ASTROVISION ULTRA 70 with 70mm 15 perfs.

The reality is that GOTO did not built the 15/70 projector but was imported by the company ODYSSEY and the projector was a CDC Brand from the US (refer to Chapter 21.5)
 
 

XIX - ASTRORAMA at the Osaka Expo 70

 
The Astrorama process was fully described in the previous article.

A Century of Widescreen at the International Fairs as well as the issue of July 1970 from The American Cinematographer. There were 2 shorts: "The Birth" 16 minutes from Tatsumi Hijikata and "March" 8 minutes, both projected on a 46m diameter Dome at the Midori-Kan Pavilion, built to display the Japanese innovations in image projections and related technologies. The photography was with 5 VistaVision cameras (35mm 8 perfs, vertical) and the projection was achieved by means of 5 projectors 70mm 8 perfs (horizontal pulldown). 424 speakers in 16 groups were mounted inside the Dome. "The Birth" was lost after the Expo 70, but found back in 2011 by the researchers from The Hijikata Archives at the Tokyo's Keio University.
 
 

XX - GOTO: ASTROVISION 10/70

 
This vertical format was exclusively produced by GOTO Optical Manufacturing Co. for its Planetarium customers in Japan and few overseas. So, this is a Dome projection known as ASTROVISION 10-70 and as previously said originated mostly from OMNIMAX 15/70.

20.1: The GOTO Theaters in Japan

Chubu
- Yamanashi: Yamanashi Prefectural Science Center Giant Screen.
- Gifu: Ogaki Suitopia Center Cosmo Dome.
- Fukui: Angel Land Fukui Astrovision Space Theatre.

Chugoku
- Okayama: Kurashiki Science Center Space Theater.

Kansai
- Osaka: Subaru Hall Astrovision Dome Theater.

Kanto
- Tokyo:
Hokutopia Science Center
Itabashi Science & Education Center Giant Screen
Setagaya Educational Center
Sumida Shoghai Gakushu Center
Fuchu Municipal Museum Kyodonomori Astrovision Dome Theatre

- Gunma: Mukai Chiaki Children's Science Museum Astrovision Dome
- Kanagawa: Shonandai Culture Center Children's Museum Cosmic Theatre
- Tochigi: Moka Scientific Education Center
- Saitama: Saitama Municipal Youth Astronomical Museum Dome Theatre

Shikoku
- Kagawa: Sanuki Kodomo Kuni Children's Park Astrovision Theatre

Kyushu & Okinawa
- Fukuoka: Fukuoka Science Museum Cosmo Theatre
- Nagasaki: Holland Village Astrovision Dome Theatre
- Kumamoto: Kumamoto City Museum Giant Screen Dome Theatre

Tohoku
- Miyagi:
Osaki Life Learning Center Astrovision Dome
Sendai City Children's Space Center Giant Screen
Sendai Meruparaku Astrovision Dome Theatre
- Fukushima: Koriyama Municipal Science Museum Giant Screen Theatre

Today, these theatres have "upgraded" to Digital.

20.2: The films in GOTO 10/70

The movies were also formatted in 8/70 to suit the iWERKS system (refer to Chapter 22)

1982 - "Tomorrow in Space"

1984 - "Grand Canyon: The Hidden Secrets"

1987 - "Niagara: Miracles, Myth & Magic"

1991 - "Ring of Fire"

1992 -
• "Search for the Great Sharks"
• "To Be an Astronaut"

1995 -
• "The Living Sea"
• “Mystery of the Maya"

1998 -
• "Everest"
• "The Greatest Places" (not available in 8/70)
• "Mysteries of Egypt"

2000 -
• "Dolphins"
• "Ocean Oasis"

2001 - "Ocean Origins" (not available in 8/70)

2002 - "Jane Goodall's Wild Chimpanzees"

2003 -
• "Coral Reef Adventure"
• "Legend of the Forest: Special Edition"

2005 - "Mystery of the Nile"

2007 -
• "Mummies: Secret of the Pharaohs"
• "Dinosaurs Alive"

2008 - "Wild Ocean"

2010 - "Furusato: World Heritage viewed from Space"

The writers only found one movie shot in Astrovision 70 (10/70) as follows:

1990 - ‘’The Nature’’
Director: Jun Asakawa.
CG Director: Takahiko Akiyama.
Producer: Dentsu / Cinecel / Imagica / Links.
Presented for the Expo 90: The International Garden and Greenery Exposition (Osaka).
Shown also at the Siggraph 91 in the US (Siggraph Electronic Theater / US).
 
 

XXI - IMAX / OMNIMAX (IMAX Dome) and other 15/70 Processes

 
Japan had the privilege to have witnessed the launchings of all the IMAX systems during the International Fairs locally based.

- Expo 70 / Osaka / "Tiger Child" / IMAX 2D

- Expo 85 / Tsukuba
"Skyward" / IMAX 2D
"Hartland" / IMAX 2D
"Shijin no Je" / IMAX 2D
"We are Born of Stars" / OMNIMAX 3D

- Expo 90 / Osaka
"Flowers in the Sky" / IMAX MAGIC CARPET
"Echoes of the Sun" / IMAX SOLIDO
"Flying Raft" / IMAX 2D
"The Last Buffalo" / IMAX 3D
"The Flower Planet" / IMAX 2D

By the end of 1990, Japan was equipped with nine IMAX Theatres out of 68 worldwide, making them second to the US. As previously mentioned, there are no more 15/70 theatres since they are all now Digital or closed. In June 29th, 2008, IMAX had a record setting movie at the Tokyo Dome; 25.000 spectators watched "Speed Racer" on a giant IMAX screen in Digital-DMR.

• Go to The Birth of IMAX
• Go to More Widescreen At The Fairs

21.1: 15/70 Theatres

(F) - Flat Screen
(D) - Dome Screen

Most of the theatres below already disappeared. Some (Shinagawa and Sapporo) are showing 2K Digital IMAX films on reduces-size screens.

- Tsuruga Fukui: Kirameki Minato Kan IMAX (F)
- Nakatsugaru-gun: Shirakami Sanchi Visitors Centers IMAX Theatres (F)
- Mihama-ku: IMAX Dome @ nifty (D)
- Hamaoka: Hamaoka Nuclear Exhibition Cent OMNIMAX Theatre (D)
- Ichikawa: Chiba Museum of Science and Industry (D)
- Kagoshima: Kagoshima Municipal Science Hall Space Theatre OMNIMAX (D)
- Kitakyushu: Space World Galaxy Center (F)

- Nagano:
• Hotaka IMAX Theatre (F)
• Mercian IMAX Theatre Karuizawa (F)

- Tokyo:
• Tokyo IMAX Theatre (F)
• Adachi Children Museum IMAX Dome (D)
• Mercian IMAX Theatre Shinagawa (F)

- Aichi: Port of Nagoya Public Aquarium Ocean IMAX Theatre (F)
- Saitama: Saitama City Space Center (D)

- Osaka:
• Osaka Science Center Museum IMAX Theatre (D)
• Suntory Museum IMAX Theatre (F)

- Nagasaki: Saikai Pearl Sea Resort IMAX Dome Theatre (D)
- Sapporo: Sapporo UCI IMAX Theatre (F)
- Shima-Gun: Shima Spain Village Cambron Theatre (F)
- Tokorozawa: Tokorozawa Aviation Museum IMAX Experience Theatre (F)
- Yokohama: Yokohama Science Center IMAX Theatre (D)

21.2: Japanese IMAX movies (or with partial Japanese involvement) 15/70

1970 - ‘’Tiger Child’’ (17 minutes)
Created for the Expo 70 in Osaka and premiered at the Fuji Group Pavilion. It was partially shot in IMAX and was the first presentation in 15/70.
Produced by Asuka Productions Inc, Multiscreen Corporation Ltd
Director: Donald Brittain
Producer: Roman Kroitor and Kiichi Ichikawa

1985 - ‘’We Are Born of Stars’’ (11 minutes)
Premiered at the Expo 85 in Tsukuba. This is the first Anaglyph (red and blue lenses) single projector 3D film created for OMNIMAX (and IMAX) projection. The film is in black and white and shown at the Cosmos Dome (20M diameter) Pavilion of Fujitsu. Totally created with the use of the fastest computers in the world (at that time) by two Japanese teams: L. Team and M. Team of Tokyo. Producers: Roman Kroitor, Fumio Sumi and Sally Dundas.
Directors: Roman Kroitor and Nelson Max.
Computer Graphics by Fujitsu Limited.

1988 - "Beavers" (31 minutes)
Produced by Stephen Low and commissioned for the Nagoya office of Dentsu Inc as a presentation of the Chubu Electric Power Company
Executive Producer: Takashi Yodono
Premiered on April 28th, 1988 at the Hamakoa Power Plant Visitor's Center

1989 - "Only the Earth" (17 minutes)
Produced by Dentsu Prox Inc. for the Nisseki Earth Pavilion at the Yokohama Exotic Showcase 1989
Director: Yasushi Kase
Producer: Takashi Mori

1989 - ‘’Sea Fantasy’’ (17 minutes)
This film explores Japan’s Inland Sea région as well as other Ocean areas in California and Hawaii.
Produced for Sea & Islands Hiroshima Expo 89
Producer: Susumu Sakane
Director: Yasuji Okamoto
Cinematography: Kitaro Kanematsu

1990 - "Creatures of the Seasons" (22 minutes)
This movie is depicting the Japanese Flora and Fauna through the seasons, for the Chubu Electric Power Corporation
Distributor: Dentsu Tec Inc.
Producer: Takashi Mori
Director: Noriko Higasa

1990 - "Flying Raft" (20 minutes)
For the Expo 90 - Osaka.
Distributor: Dentsu Tec Inc.
Producer: Sadaaki Okano
Director: Yoshihide Okumura

1991 - "Hidden Hawaii" (34 minutes)
The Distributors are National Geographic and Cinema Japan Co. Ltd (aka Sky East)
Film produced by the US

1993 - "Reach for the Sky" (18 minutes)
This is the first IMAX clay animation production created by Fumiko Magari for the Tokorozawa Aviation Museum (Saitama Prefecture). The story is based upon two aviation engineers: Captain Tokugaway and Captain Kumozo Hino who made the first official flight in the Japanese history on
April 5th, 1911
Director: Akira Hanatsuya

1994 - "An Ant's Dream of the Sea" (20 minutes)
Designed by the City of Sasebo and the insect photographer Satoshi Kuribayashi who was also the Executive Producer
Director: Yoshinobu Kato
The movie is about a message to the world that we can discover and learn to understand the mysteries of Nature by looking at small creatures such as the Ants

1994 - "Viva la Blanca Paloma" (23 minutes)
At the Pentecost every year, thousands of pilgrims gather at El Rocio (Spain) to meet the Virgin they call The Blanca Paloma of El Rocio
Produced by Dentsu Inc. for presentation at the IMAX Theatre of Shima Spain Village Cambron in Mie (Shima-Gun)
Producers: Keiko Machida and Yasushi Sakaguchi
Director: Masahiko Fujihisa

1995 - "Shinsyu Symphony" (38 minutes)
Yuki is a little girl learning how to play the violin in the Nagaro Prefecture. The theme of "Shinsyu Symphony" is the co-existence of the nature and the human beings. Many traditions such as the "Gokaicho" from the Zenkoji Temple, is held every seven years, are shown in this movie
Producer: Masao Takahashi
Director: Toru Hamada
Score: Kensaku Tanigawa

1995 - "Urushi: The Japanese Beauty" (30 minutes)
Little is known about this movie supposedly distributed by the GOTO Optical Manufacturing Co.
This film is documenting the Japanese History and Culture which influenced the transformation of Urushi, a lacquer technique introduced from China 4000 years ago, to its present form so unique to Japan

1996 - "Island Adventure Magic Reunion" (40 minutes)
A French movie about La Reunion island, East of Madagascar. This is geography at its best.
Directors: Jean Pierre Chardon and Alain Gerente.
Distributors: Groupe 47 (France) and Cinema Japan Co. (aka Sky East)

1998 - "The Shirakami Mountains" (40 minutes)
Signature movie for the Shirakami-sanchi World Heritage Area. This area is inhabited by ancient beech forest and wildlife.
Distributor: Cinesell Japan Inc.

1999 - "Chang Jiang:The Great River of China" (40 minutes).
This is regarding the Yangtze River (China), viewed from the perspective of a young violinist Canadian, a member of the Shanghai Orchestra. One day, she decides to follow the river from its source in Qinghai up to the East China Sea at Shanghai.
Produced by Dentsu Tec Inc. and China Research Institute of Film Science and Technology
Producers: Keiko Machida and Ki Shu Ping
Directors: Yasushi Sakaguchi and Atsushi Kanamata
Sponsors: Various Japanese companies
Presented in 1999 at the National Film Museum of Beijing on a screen of 27M x 21M

2010 - "Furusato: World Heritage viewed from Space" (38 minutes - 3D)
Produced by Maraikan for the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Daiba (Tokyo). The movie was shot in Digital 4K and converted to IMAX 15-7 and IWERKS 8/70 and GOTO 10-70. The images are broadcast from the satellite Daichi observing the World Heritage Sites
Director: Hiromi Kusaka
Producer: Naohiko Ogawa

21.3 - IMAX movies from overseas

This list is up to 2007, so 3 years are missing.

1982 -
"Hail Columbia!"

1985 -
"The Dream is Alive"

1990 -
"Blue Planet"

1991 -
"Rolling Stones at the Max"

1992 -
"Fires of Kuwait"
"Mountain Gorilla"
"Titanica"

1993 -
"The Secret of Life on Earth"

1994 -
"Into the Deep"
"Destiny in Space"

1996 -
"Survival Island"
"Special Effects / Anything can Happens"
"L5: First City in Space"
"Cosmic Voyage"

1997 -
"The IMAX Nutcracker"
"Mission to Mir"
"The Hidden Dimension"

1998 -
"T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous"
"Africa's Elephant Kingdom"

1999 -
"Island of the Sharks"
"Galapagos" (3D)

2000 -
"Cyber Workd"

2001 -
"China: The Panda Adventure"
"All Access: Backstage. Front Row. LIVE!"

2002 -
"Space Station" (3D)
"Santa vs the Snowman" (3D)
"Horses: The Story of Equus"
"Apollo 13: The IMAX Experience"

2004 -
"Nascar" (3D)

2005 -
"Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon" (3D)

2006 -
"Deep Sea"

And some Ultra shorts.

1987 - "Primiti Too Taa" (3 minutes)
1989 - "Slitscan" (1 minute)
1997 - "Paint Musbehavin" (3D) (2 minutes)
2003 - "Falling in Love Again" (3 minutes)

Go to The Mini IMAX Movies in 1570

And some feature films (IMAX DMR)

2002 -
"Apollo 13"
"Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones"
"The Matrix Reloaded"

2003 -
"The Matrix Revolutions"

2004 -
"Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban"
"Spider-Man 2"
"The Polar Express"

2005 -
"Robots"
"Batman Begins"
"Charlie and the Chocolate Factory"
"Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire"

2006 -
"V for Vendetta"
"Poseidon"
"Superman Returns"
"The Ant Bully"
"Open Season"
"Happy Feet"
"Night at the Museum"

2007 -
"Spider-Man 3"
"Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix"

21.4 - Cinema-U (15/70)

Little is known about this process. The Cinema-U (stands for Ultra Vision) was a similar projector to the IMAX one, but lacks the smooth film transportation of the IMAX. The Cinema-U projector was used at the Shueisha Pavilion during the Tsukuba Expo 85 and developed by Shueisha-Shogakukan. The film (unknown title) was projected on a Dome of 368M2. The projector might have been developed from a Cinemeccanica basis, but this is unconfirmed.

21.5 - CDC Projector for ASTROVISION ULTRA 70

The CDC Projector 15/70 from the US was imported to Japan by the local firm World Odyssey and then marketed by GOTO. Only 3 Dome Theatres have been equipped this way:

- Izuwakamatsu City: Yamada Plaza Ultra 70 Theatre (Flat Screen)
- Kanagawa: Sagamihara City Museum Dome Theatre (Dome Screen)
- Tokyo: Tama Rokuto Science Center Dome Theatre (Dome Screen)

Source: James Hyder from LF Examiner.
 
 

XXII - IWERKS 8/70

 
The 8/70 format from IWERKS was well introduced in Japan, 16 IWERKS Theatres versus 21 IMAX. 8/70 was also catering for the two types of theatres:

- The Flat Screen called IWERKS 8/70
- The Dome Screen called IWERKSPHERE 8/70

22.1 - The Theatres 8/70

- Akita: Akita Furusato Mura Kamakura Theatre (F)
- Gunma: Gunma Children's Museum Giant Screen (D)
- Hitachi: Hitachi Civic Center Minolta Dome Theatre (D)
- Kyoto:
• Juridical Foundation, Leisure Activity Center of Joyo (D)
• Kyoto Studio Park Toei Uzuma Eigamura: Movieland IWERKS (D)

- Shizuoka: Dogashima Visitor Center Giant Screen (D)
- Mie: Mie Adventure Park Space Center (D)
- Nagasaki: Nagasaki Science Museum Giant Screen Theatre (D)
- Osaka: Sakai City Education & CultureCenter (D)
- Shiretoko: Shiretoko Nature Center Dyna Vision (F)
- Oda: Sanbe Field Museum Giant Screen (D)
- Tokyo: Higashi OHTE Building (D)
- Toyohashi: Toyohashi Museum of Natural History Giant Screen Theatre (F)
- Toyokawa: Minolta Toyokawa Administration Center (D)
- Kumage-gun: Yakushima Kanyo Bunka Mura (F)
- Yokohama: Hakkejima Sea Paradise-Aqua Theatre (D)

22.2 - IWERKS Japanese movies

Three movies have been produced:

1988 - ‘’Four Seasons of Shiretoko’’ (20 minutes)
Produced in Dyna Vision 870 for the Shiretoko Nature Center.
Opened in 1988 with a screen of 20M x 12M .
This film is about the gorgeous seasonal scenery of Shiretoko,including aerial shots of the Shiretoko Goko Lakes and footage about wild animals and drift ice.

1996 - "Pilialoha" (32 minutes)
Produced by Encom Digital Design for Benesse Corp.
Pilialoha means friendship in the Hawaiian language. However, a Japanese and a Hawaiian boy manage to become friends and search for a magical flower that will make a miracle. This film is a message about cross cultural communication for the children all around the world.

1999 - "Olympic Glory" (aka Alps Symphony) (42 minutes)
Welcome to the 23rd Winter Olympic Games in Nagano. This movie is having the unique characteristic to be shot in 8/70 and reformatted to 15/70 and as such presented on IMAX screens.
Director: Kieth Merril
Producers: Frank Marshall and Kathleen Kennedy
Distributor: MegaSystems Inc.
Film presented as a celebration to Shinshu, the site of those 23rd Olympic Winter Games in 1998

22.3 - IWERKS Overseas movies

With the exceptions of the above-mentioned films, all the other 8/70 presentations were formatted from the IMAX movies 15/70. Most of the movies were like the ones shown in Chapter 21.3 and are not repeated here. More than 150 movies have been projected this way worldwide. The complete listing can be seen on the website of LF Examiner as well as Big Movie Zone.

22.4 - IWERKS Imagine 360

The IWERKS Imagine 360 was based on the Swissorama Process projecting from one film 70mm 10 perfs (pulldown) on a 360 degrees’ screen. The projector is installed at the ceiling. Swissorama (fully documented on this website) was developed by Ernst Heiniger from Lucerne (Switzerland). The IWERKS Imagine 360 is mostly a refinement of the Swissorama but only three movies were produced this way:

1988 - "Nature in Shikoku"
Presented for the Seto Ohashi Expo 88 at the Shikoku Pavilion near the City of Kagawa

1989 - "Das Panorama Berlin"
Opened in December 1989 in Berlin / Germany

1992 - "Mi Pais Biasco"
For the Expo 92 at Seville / Spain

22.5 - JAPAX / Japanese process 8/70

JAPAX was a Japanese adaptation of the IWERKS 8/70, 70mm film with 6 channel sound. Only one movie has been demonstrated at The Health and Sports Pavilion during the International Science Technology Expo 85 at Tsukuba.

Title: "Breathe"
The screen was 23m x 17m
Sponsor: Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.
 
 

XXIII - Japanese Animations in 70mm

 
Japanese Animations are an Art specific to Japan and gradually known all over the world. Some Festivals are starting to pay their respect to it on a regular basis. Hundreds of movies are produced yearly. With the marginal exception of "Metamorphoses" for one sequence shot in 70mm, all the animated movies have been photographed in 35mm or Digitally created. Few have been blown up or even formatted to 15/70.

Here is the list:

1978 - "Metamorphoses (aka Winds of Change)" (80 minutes)
Blown up to 70mm with one sequence in 70mm directed by Sadao Miyamoto.
Japanese release: October 27th, 1979
Director: Takashi
Executive Producer: Shintaro Tsuji

1983 - "Space Battleship Yamato, the Final Chapter" (163 minutes)
Shot in 65mm separately from 35mm version, according to Nishizaki.
Japanese release: November 5th, 1983
Premiered at the Shibuya Pantheon Theatre (Tokyo)
Directors: Tomoharu Katsumata and Yoshinobu Nishizaki
Producer: Yoshinobu Nishizaki

1988 - "Akira" (124 minutes)
Probably the most well known outside Japan and presented in many Film Festivals worldwide even today.
Blown up to 70mm
Japanese release: July 16th to July 22nd, 1988 at the Nichigeki Plaza Gekikou (Tokyo)
Re-release: January 21st to January 27th, 1989 at the Toho Shikishima Gekikou (Osaka)
Director: Katsuhiro Otomo
Production: Akira Committee Company Ltd.

1989 - " Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland (94 minutes (Japan))
A Japano-American animation film, premiered in Japan in 1989, and two more years later in a shorter version in US. During the troubled years of production two big names (Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata) joined the team but left in one year. The box-office was a disaster in both countries.
In limited theatres, including Cinerama OS Gekijou, blown-up 70mm prints were used.
Directors: Masami Hata, William T. Hurtz
Production: Tokyo Movie Shinsha

2003 - "Legend of the Forest: Special Edition" (29 minutes)
An unfinished animation film by Osamu Tezuka.
The original presentation in Japan was on February 13th 1988 and was re released
on April 26th 2003 in the format 15/70 / 10-70 / 8/70.

2004 - "Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence" (100 minutes)
Japanese release: March 6th, 2004
Presented in many Film Festivals, Cannes included.
Digitally shot but formatted to 15/70 for IMAX Shinagawa (Tokyo) on June 25th, 2004

2005 - "Astro Boy vs Igza" (40 minutes)
The movie was only presented in Japan and formatted as an IMAX movie.
Japanese release: September 1st, 2005
Director: Naoko Takeuchi
Distributor: Sarai Inc.
Sponsored by Meiji Candy Co.

2007 - "Galaxy Express 999: The Starlit Sky is a Time Machine” (32 minutes)
First Giant Screen Film from Toei Animation Co. Ltd. formatted to IMAX 15/70
Japanese release: July 14th, 2007
Producer: Hiromi Kuzo

2016 - "Your Name" (106 minutes)
Premier release date at the Los Angeles Expo 2016 on July 3rd, 2016 and in Japan on August 26th, 2016. Digitally shot and IMAX DMR process for a re-release on January 13th, 2017 in Tokyo.
This was the fourth highest grossing film in Japan and the fifth highest grossing as a non-English film worldwide.
Director: Makoto Shinkai
Producers: Noritaka Kawaguchi and Genki Kawamura
 
 

XXIV - Showscan 5/70 at 60 FPS

 
Showscan was developed by Douglas Trumbull. The very first Showscan movie was ‘’Night of Dreams’’ in 1978 with a duration of 12 minutes. Japan witnessed 16 theatres putting them in second position after the US. There were another two Digital Showscan called HD (High definition) with a speed down to 48 Frames/second. The local Company Imagine was the Showscan exclusive agent (a unit of Takayama Busan). The Premiere in Japan was at the The International Exposition, Tsukuba, Japan, 1985. The Showscan process was installed at the Toshiba Pavilion in a square Theatre with 540 seats. The screen was 25.6m x 11.0m and 26 loudspeakers through the auditorium. The movie was ‘’Let’s Go’’ (15 minutes). In this movie was a robot called PAL and Steven Spielberg used it for his movie ‘’Short Circuit’’.

There was also a simulation ride movie: ‘’Deep Sea Rescue’’ (5 minutes). The audience was inside a submarine simulator. One of the last Showscan movie (5/70) was: ’’Life is a Roller Coaster’’ in May 2000, produced by Peter Henton for the International Center for Life in Newcastle Upon Tyne (UK). This movie was for a simulation theatre called Helix equipped with 48 seats and a screen of 11.5m.

In Japan the 5/70 Showscan theatres were the following:

- HYOGO / Himeji Central Park / 50 seats / October 1989.
- KAGAWA / Reoma World / 90 seats / April 1991.
- KANAGAWA / Hakone / 100 seats / August 1996.
- KITA KYUSHU / Space World / 100 seats / March 1992.
- KYOTO / Uzumasa / 48 seats / March 1997.
- MIYASAKI / MHI Ocean Dome / 20 seats / July 1993.
- MIYASAKI / MHI Ocean Dome / 117 seats / July 1993.
- NAGOYA / Sea Train Land / 30 seats / July 1996.
- OSAKA / Expoland / 50 seats / April 1991.
- OSAKA / Hirakata Park / 50 seats / October 1995.
- OSAKA / Kasumi / 48 seats / July 1997.
- SAITAMA / Subu UNESCO Village / 100 seats / December 1993.
- SHIZUOKA / PAL PAL / 50 seats / July 1997.
- TOKYO / Tokyo Science Muséum / 72 seats / January 1993.
- TOKYO / Namco / 56 seats / July 1997.
- YOKOHAMA / Yokohama Dream Land / 50 seats / July 1997.
 
 

XXV - Conclusion

 
Like Aoki Eiji said in 2016, there are now no more 70mm capable theaters in Japan except for the NFC in Tokyo. However, Japan has witnessed for many years the Golden Age of the Argentic and this must be remembered.

KAN (The End)
 
 

Photo gallery (Newspaper advertisements)

 
Chapter I
01-01_The Robe
01-02_Otorijo no hanayome
01-03_Meiji Tenno to Nichiro Dai Senso
01-04_Ghekka no wakamusha
01-05_Oatari sanshoku musume
01-06_Dakareta hanayome
01-07_Yuki no wataridori

Chapter II
02-01_Carousel
02-02_The King and I

Chapter III
03-01_This is Cinerama
03-02_Cinerama Holiday
03-03_Seven Wonders
03-04_Search for Paradise
03-05_South Seas Adventure
03-06_How the West Was Won
03-07_Brothers Grimm

Chapter V
05-01_Oklahoma
05-02_Around the World
05-03_South Pacific
05-04_Can-Can
05-05_The Alamo
05-06_Cleopatra
05-07_The Sound of Music
05-08_Agony and Ecstasy
05-09_Those Magnificent Men
05-10_Doctor Dolittle
05-11_Star
05-12_Hello Dolly
05-13_Airport

Chapter VI
06-01_Ben Hur
06-02_Mutiny on the Bounty
06-03_It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
06-04_The Fall of the Roman Empire
06-05_Battle of the Bulge

Chapter VII
07-01_Jigokubana
07-02_Yuuwaku kara no dasshutsu
07-03_Zenigata Heiji torimono hikae
07-04_Mahiru no taiketsu
07-05_Meido no kaoyaku
07-06_Akado Suzunosuke
07-07_Tokyo no hitomi
07-08_Tsukihime keizu
07-09_Yuukyou gonin otoko
07-10_Hyouheki

Chapter VIII
08-1-01_Shaka
08-1-02_Taiheiyo Senso to Himeyuri Butai
08-1-03_Shinno Shikotei
08-2-01_Cartagine in Fiamme
08-2-02_Spartacus
08-2-03_King of Kings
08-2-04_El Cid
08-2-05_Un, Deux, Trois, Quatre
08-2-06_Madame Sans Gêne
08-2-07_Barabbas
08-2-08_55 Days at Peking
08-2-09_Circus World
08-2-10_Custer of the West

Chapter IX
09-01_Exodus
09-02_West Side Story
09-03_Lawrence of Arabia
09-04_My Fair Lady
09-05_Cheyenne Autumn
09-06_Lord Jim
09-07_Grand Prix
09-08_2001 a Space Odyssey
09-09_Ice Station Zebra
09-10_Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
09-11_Mackenna's Gold
09-12_Song of Norway
09-13_Ryan's Daughter
09-14_Playtime
09-15_Brainstorm
09-16_Far and Away

Chapter X
10-01_The Story of the Flaming Years
10-02_The Sleeping Beauty
10-03_Bolshoi Ballets
10-04_War and Peace(1and2)
10-05_War and Peace(3and4)
10-06_Liberation(1and2)
10-07_Liberation(3)
10-08_Liberation(4and5)
10-09_Dersu Uzala

Chapter XI
11-01_Windjammer


Chapter XII
12-01_It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World Same as 06-03
12-02_Mediterranean Holiday
12-03_Circus World Same as 08-2-09
12-04_The Greatest Story Ever Told
12-05_The Hallelujah Trail
12-06_Battle of the Bulge Same as 06-05
12-07_Khartoum
12-08_Grand Prix Same as 09-07
12-09_Custer of the West
12-10_2001 A Space Odyssey Same as 09-08
12-11_Ice Station Zebra Same as 09-09
12-12_Krakatoa East of Java

Chapter XIII
13-01_Two Hours in USSR


 
Chapter XIV
14-01_Sheherazade
14-02_The Black Tulip
14-03_Old Shatterhand
14-04_Uncle Tom's Cabin

Chapter XV
15-01_The Bible in the Beginning
15-02_Patton
15-03_Gone With the Wind
15-04_Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
15-05_The King and I
15-06_South Pacific
15-07_West Side Story
15-08_How the West Was Won
15-09_Mediterranean Holiday
15-10_It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
15-11_The Hallelujah Trail
15-12_Those Magnificent Men
15-13_The Sand Pebbles
15-14_Once Upon a Time in the West
15-15_Cleopatra
15-16_2001 a Space Odyssey Signed solely as "70mm"
15-17_Paint Your Wagon
15-18_Tora! Tora! Tora!
15-19_Scrooge
15-20_Kelly's Heroes
15-21_Strogoff
15-22_Le Mans
15-23_El Condor
15-24_The Poseidon Adventure
15-25_The Godfather
15-26_The Day of the Jackal
15-27_Papillon
15-28_Zardoz
15-29_Earthquake
15-30_Rollerball
15-31_Close Encounter of the Third Kind
15-32_Star Wars
15-33_Grease
15-34_Alien
15-35_Apocalypse Now
15-36_The Empire Strikes Back
15-37_Raiders of the Lost Ark
15-38_The Return of the Jedi

Chapter XVI
16-01_Gone with the Wind
16-02_The Bridge on the River Kwai
16-03_Ben Hur
16-04_West Side Story
16-05_Lawrence of Arabia
16-06_Cleopatra
16-07_Doctor Zhivago
16-08_The Bible in the Beginning
16-09_The Dirty Dozen
16-10_Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
16-11_Alfred the Great
16-12_Goodbye Mr Chips
16-13_Winning
16-14_Mackenna's Gold Same as 09-11
16-15_Marooned
16-16_Monte Carlo Rally
16-17_Cromwell
16-18_Patton Same as 15-02
16-19_Darling Lili
16-20_Tora Tora Tora Same as 15-18
16-21_Fiddler on the Roof
16-22_Le Mans
16-23_The African Elephant
16-24_Red Sun
16-25_Young Winston
16-26_The Great Waltz
16-27_Elvis on Tour
16-28_The Godfather Same as 15-25
16-29_Lost Horizon
16-30_The Day of the Jackal Same as 15-26
16-31_Westworld
16-32_The Outfit
16-33_Papillon Same as 15-27
16-34_Zardoz Same as 15-28
16-35_One by One
16-36_Earthquake Same as 15-29
16-37_Rollerball Same as 15-30
16-38_Three Days of the Condor
16-39_Rosebud
16-40_The Food for the Gods
16-41_The Message
16-42_Logan's Run
16-43_Damnation Alley
16-44_Close Encounter of the Third Kind Same as 15-31
16-45_Star Wars Same as 15-32
16-46_Grease Same as 15-33
16-47_The Deer Hunter
16-48_The Wiz
16-49_Alien Same as 15-34
16-50_Moonraker
16-51_Apocalypse Now Same as 15-35
16-52_The Black Hole
16-53_The Empire Strikes Back Same as 15-36
16-54_Heaven's Gate
16-55_Raiders of the Lost Ark
16-56_Poltergeist
16-57_Brainstorm
16-58_Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
16-59_Starman
16-60_Young Sherlock Holmes
16-61_Silverado
16-62_Rambo: First Blood Part II
16-63_Back to the Future
16-64_Aliens Same as 16-62
16-65_The Living Daylights
16-66_The Untouchables
16-67_Willow
16-68_Cocoon: The Return
16-69_Die Hard
16-70_Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland
16-71_Black Rain
16-72_Dick tracy
 
Chapter XVII
17-001_Gone with the Wind
17-002_The King and I
17-003_Guns of Navarone
17-004_Taras Bulba
17-005_The Longest Day
17-006_Bye Bye Birdie
17-007_The Cardinal
17-008_Genghis Khan
17-009_In Harm's Way
17-010_Operation Crossbow
17-011_Heroes of Telemark
17-012_The Great Race
17-013_Doctor Zhivago
17-014_The Professionals
17-015_Is Paris Burning?
17-016_The Sand Pebbles
17-017_Les Demoiselles de Rochefort
17-018_Camelot
17-019_The Comedians
17-020_Far From the Maddening Crowd
17-021_Half a Sixpence
17-022_Guns for San Sebastian
17-023_Oliver!
17-024_Where Eagles Dare
17-025_Hell in the Pacific
17-026_Hellfighters
17-027_Funny Girl
17-028_The Shoes of the Fisherman
17-029_The Wild Bunch
17-030_Anne of the Thousand Days
17-031_Scrooge
17-032_Waterloo
17-033_Elvis That's the Way it is
17-034_Once Upon a Wheel
17-035_Fiddler on the Roof
17-036_Nicholas and Alexandra
17-037_Mary, Queen of Scots
17-038_Antony and Cleopatra
17-039_The Cowboys
17-040_Man of la Mancha
17-041_The Poseidon Adventure
17-042_Papillon
17-043_The Three Musketeers
17-044_The Great Gatsby
17-045_Earthquake Same as 15-28
17-046_Airport 1975
17-047_Gold
17-048_That's Entertainment
17-049_Rollerball Same as 15-29
17-050_Lucky Lady
17-051_The Wind and the Lion
17-052_The Return of a Man Called Horse
17-053_A Star is Born
17-054_Close Encounter of the Third Kind
17-055_Star Wars Same as 15-30
17-056_Grease Same as 15-31
17-057_Superman
17-058_Alien Same as 15-32
17-059_Moonraker Same as 16-50
17-060_1941 Same as 16-50
17-061_Apocalypse Now Same as 15-34
17-062_The Black Hole Same as 16-52
17-063_Altered States
17-064_The Empire Strikes Back Same as 15-34
17-065_Superman II
17-066_Heaven's Gate Same as 16-54
17-067_Outland
17-068_Raiders of the Lost Ark Same as 15-35
17-069_Quest for Fire
17-070_Poltergeist
17-071_Tron
17-072_E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
17-073_The Return of the Jedi Same as 15-38
17-074_The Right Stuff
17-075_Anna Pavlova
17-076_Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
17-077_Amadeus
17-078_Starman
17-079_Back to the Future
17-080_The Goonies
17-081_A Chorus Line
17-082_Silverado
17-083_Young Sherlock Holmes
17-084_Aliens
17-085_Howard the Duck
17-086_Top Gun
17-087_The Mission
17-088_The Untouchables
17-089_The Living Daylights
17-090_Robocop
17-091_Willow
17-092_Le Grand Bleu
17-093_Who Framed Roger Rabbit
17-094_Die Hard
17-095_The Bear
17-096_Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
17-097_Black Rain
17-098_Lethal Weapon 2
17-099_Batman
17-100_Dick tracy
17-101_The Godfather III
17-102_Memphis Bell
17-103_Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Countny
17-104_Hook
17-105_Beauty and the Beast
17-106_Patriot Games
17-107_1492: Conquest of Paradise
17-108_Cliffhanger

Chapter XXIII
23-01_Metamorphoses
23-02_Final Yamato
23-03_Akira
23-04_Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland
 
   


 

 
  
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Updated 21-12-18