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"Cinema Retro" - The Golden Age of Film Making
Welcome to the premiere issue

Read more at
in70mm.com
The 70mm Newsletter
Written by: Lee Pfeiffer and Dave Worrall Date: 28 May 2006
Cinema Retro, Issue #1, January 2005

In early 2005 I was contacted by Mr. Dave Worrall, co-editor of "Cinema Retro" - a new English/US glossy 64-page magazine with a difference. There are no adverts, except a few advertising movie memorabilia and the magazine is about the movies of the 1960s and 1970s - considered by many as the Golden Age of movies. At least the sixties was the golden age of 70mm film.

I was intrigued by this magazine. Finally, I can read about my favourites like Lalo Schifrin, "The Great Escape", James Bond, new releases of classic soundtracks, exploitation movies, vintage press material and classic adverts, voluptuous female nudity, obscure movies, Frank Gorshin's obituary (and many more) and lot and lots and lots of interesting images in full color and black & white.

I wish the editors and publishers the best of luck with this publication. For the benefit of in70mm.com readers, I have re-printed Cinema Retro's, foreword from issue #1.

All details about subscription is available at their website

Next issue is published in September 2006 and features an interview with William Shatner and an 8-page special about "Casino Royale"
 
More in 70mm reading:

Ken Annakin

Internet link:

Cinema Retro

Welcome to Cinema Retro

 
Lee Pfeiffer, Ken Annakin and Dave Worrall

Welcome to the premiere issue of Cinema Retro. The very fact that you are reading this means you don’t have to be convinced that the 60's and 70's were the last 'Golden Age' of film-making. If you're thinking 'We need another movie magazine like we need a sequel to “Ishtar”, keep in mind that most film-related publications deal with contemporary movies or are dedicated to a specific genre. Cinema Retro is the first publication dedicated to an era. For movie-lovers, the 60's and 70's were the most exciting years imaginable. Emerging talents like Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, Peter Bogdanovich and George Lucas came of age professionally while, simultaneously, icons such as Alfred Hitchcock, John Huston, Howard Hawks and John Sturges were still actively making films. For movie fans, this was pure manna from heaven. 
 
 
Cinema Retro, Issue #2, May 2005

Today, however, the film industry has undergone radical changes, mostly for the worse. The aforementioned newcomers of the 60's now represent some of the last remaining vestiges of class and reverence for the filmmakers who preceded them. Hollywood is now youth-obsessed and the definition of a successful film has changed dramatically. Thus, we see films gross over $100 million and are still considered to be failures. The emergence of CGI is now so routine and overused that the technology is already a bore. Sure, we welcome it in fantasies like “The Lord of the Rings”, but do we really need CGI in Gwyneth Paltrow comedies? And when was t he last time you saw an action/adventure film that didn't toss away all logic to fit in more climaxes than a porn movie? Similarly, we're also unimpressed with the vast majority of today's 'stars'. Although many are indisputably talented, we long for the class and style that once made actors and actresses seem larger-than-life. John Wayne, Kate Hepburn, Burt Lancaster and Liz Taylor were stars. Ben Affleck, Jennifer Lopez, Cameron Diaz and Keanu Reeves are not. The expletive-spouting Colin Farrell may get more ink in the gossip columns than Clint Eastwood, but with whom would you rather dine?

 
Cinema Retro, Issue #5, May 2006

Although there are some very fine films being made today, our goal is pay tribute to the people who brought the cinema of the 60's and 70's to life, from the leading actors to the supporting players to the key grips and publicists. Their stories will be told here, often in their own words. You will also get analysis from our talented staff of writers, who are located around the globe and can provide international perspectives on the film industry. Best of all, Cinema Retro will have something for everyone. This is not the kind of magazine that caters to the 'lifted pinky' crowd. This is the only place where you will read about the merits of David Lean's “Lawrence of Arabia” and Don Knotts' “The Ghost and Mr. Chicken” in the same magazine. There is also no room for political correctness. When the studios do something stupid, we'll be ruthless in our criticism (Don't even get us started on the sad state of today's movie poster designs!). When good judgment prevails, we will offer praise - but at no time will we be beholden to anyone. We will refrain from the present trend of many mainstream journalists w ha try to prove they are 'hip' by inserting as many expletives into a story as possible. We're writing about people of class and taste and we hope our magazine will reflect that. We're not prudes. When the situation calls for it, we won't hesitate to feature erotic images and provocative comments. However, at the risk of invoking the oldest of Hollywood clichés, only when there are artistic reasons for doing so.

 
A sample from Cinema Retro, Issue #4, January 2006. Click to enlarge

Who is the target audience for Cinema Retro? Well, if your idea of a 'hunk' is Lee Marvin, if you'd rather listen to John Barry than Ice T, if you get more pleasure out of those old low-budget "Man From U. N. C.L.E" feature films than the recent "Mission: Impossible" abominations, welcome aboard! If you have to ask w hat any of these references mean, then you're I probably reading this magazine in a dentist's office. If you like w hat you see within these pages, then we ask you to help us continue this publication by subscribing. Is it expensive? Yes, because the cost of printing a magazine of this quality in a limited edition format is extremely high. Is it over-priced? No, not if you consider that every issue is produced by a team of writers who provide you with content that can't be found elsewhere. Remember, a year's subscription costs less than a mediocre meal for two in a pub and there is no significant advertising in our magazine either. By subscribing, you'll also receive exclusive bonuses and benefits listed in the advert in the back of the magazine. Best of all, you'll In never miss an issue. They will be delivered to your door so you can salivate over the most unique movie stills and artwork imaginable, as well as exciting interviews with filmmakers that you won't find in mainstream movie magazines. More importantly, you will allow two immature, middle-aged men to continue to have a ridiculous amount of fun. Please send us your comments via E-mail, letter or carrier pigeon. Let us know w hat we're doing right or wrong, and we promise we'll listen.
 
If you want to learn more about the people behind Cinema Retro, please visit our web site. (We promise you won't get any annoying pop-up ads pitching great land deals in Florida or that teenage nymphomaniacs really, truly can't live without you!). We'd like to officially thank our terrific staff as well as all the professionals from the film industry who have helped make Cinema Retro a reality. Most of all, thank you for giving us a try. We think Ibis is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.
 
 
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Updated 22-12-16